History

Family Nurturing Center was founded in 1994 by Sharon Shay Workman, Ph.D. to prevent child abuse and neglect by spreading comprehensive systems of family support across Boston and the Commonwealth. Initially established within the Department of Pediatrics at Boston City Hospital, FNC began with the goal of creating more nurturing environments within the hospital and surrounding communities.  As programs expanded and efforts in the community gained success, FNC focused on working with many Boston organizations to strengthen families in urban neighborhoods.

In 1997, Family Nurturing Center moved from Boston City Hospital to Dorchester and became an independent non-profit organization in 1999.

Historical Highlights:

With funding from the Department of Children & Families, opened a Family Resource Center at the John Marshall School Elementary School (now the Up Academy Charter School of Dorchester) in 2010.

Selected in 2010 as a Hub Agency for Thrive in Five’s Community School Readiness Wiring Project.

In 2009, became the lead agency for Boston's Parent-Child Home Program - a national, evidence-based home-visiting model designed to develop early literacy skills and improve parent-child interaction (for parents and their children ages 18 months to 3 years).

Merged with Dorchester CARES, a long-term community partner with a similar mission, in 2008.

Launched Smart from the Start in partnership with the City of Boston, the Boston Housing Authority, and the Boston Centers for Youth and Families in 2007 to deliver early literacy and family support programming, based on FNC’s model, to low-income Boston housing developments.

Began collaborating in 2007 with Boston Public Schools' Countdown to Kindergarten to replicate our Allston-Brighton school-based Parent-Child Playgroups.

Received the Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Children’s Health for our Allston-Brighton Family Support Network in 2006.

Began working with the Department of Children and Families in the late 1990's to spread the FNC model for family support to other communities.  A network of more than twenty community coalitions now offers comprehensive family support in the highest risk urban and rural areas of the Commonwealth through the Department's "Community Connections" program.